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"You lose a lot more in golf than you win. So when you do win, you have to enjoy it. I'm going to go back home and enjoy it with my friends and enjoy it with my family and, yeah, I love being from Northern Ireland. I tell everyone how great it is. For me, it's the best place on earth. I'm obviously biased, but I love it back there and I love the people."

 

 

HINT: Look at the bottom of the page.

 

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It’s believed that Tiger Woods has inspired multi-generational players with his on course performance. While several years his junior, Jordan Spieth appears to have already made an impact with at least one individual who could be on his way to the PGA TOUR before too long. Brad Dalke is the 2015 Junior PGA Championship, which also earned him a place in this week’s Valero Texas Open field.

Dalke wears Under Armour head to toe and admits Spieth has inspired him. “He's a great guy, great role model to look up to. I am inspired by his composure on the course, the way he plays his golf and his game. You know, he's a great guy to look up. I'm definitely try to emulate myself after him,” he said. “ He's obviously done a great job these first few years on the Tour. I've played with him once, lost to him by 2. I'm very inspired by him.”

Dalke also made a name for himself off the course last year too. He challenged Rory McIlroy to an arm wrestling contest and the 17-year old came beat the world #1. “I was surprised by how big that got,” he said. “I tweeted the video and I think it ended up getting like 700 re-tweets and something like that. It was cool. Went viral. I definitely wasn't expecting that. It was really cool. There's not many guys out there that will be No. 1 in the world at the time and arm wrestle a 17 year old at the junior events. He's a great guy and I was really surprised that he accepted the challenge.” Dalke added he won’t look to push his luck this week in arm wrestling. “I don't think I'll challenge anybody this week. I'll go one and done on that one.” Dalke will look to let his clubs do his talking this week and no matter what happens, he’ll get a first hand look at what it takes to get to the next level.

 

The R&A is showing its support for nine hole golf. It is introducing a new championship at Royal Troon this summer. The inaugural event for amateurs will be played on Saturday July 9th at Royal Troon, giving the players the opportunity to play nine holes at the historic Ayrshire links on the eve of The 145TH Open. In 2017, the event will be expanded to cover golf clubs in Great Britain and Ireland with players being given the opportunity to qualify at nine hole events held by The R&A’s affiliated national associations in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Padraig Harrington, two-time Champion Golfer of the Year and R&A Working for Golf Ambassador, welcomed the initiative. “People who want to play golf are increasingly struggling to find the time to play and so positioning nine hole golf as a legitimate alternative makes a lot of sense,” he said. “I’m really pleased to see The R&A taking the lead in this area. For regular amateur golfers to be able to play The Open venue in championship condition immediately before the best players in the world is a fantastic initiative and I’m sure this new competitive format will encourage more people to get out on the golf course and play nine hole golf.”

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Can a little something possibly turn into something big? One equipment company is intrigued to find out if that is possible. The car industry has its super cars that are sold in limited quantities but fetch exorbitant prices. For example, Ford is selling only 500 GT Supercar at $400,000 a piece. Applicants have until May 12th to state their case why they should be one of the few to own one of these dream machines. Go figure?

But Titleist is dipping its toe into this pool as its R&D team has been pushing management to give it some addition room to work with on the club side of the business. In turn management is throwing the ball back in R&D’s court by saying let’s see what you can do. The result is Titleist Concept Clubs have been unveiled. In speaking with Titleist officials, the company’s engineers have expressed a strong belief that it can do more with club performance and yet stay well within the equipment rules governing the game. In large part equipment is often engineered with the best players in the world in mind. Yet only a relative few are fortunate enough to be considered in this category and frankly, they never pay for their equipment. But they validate the product and process to those that ultimately fund the golf economy.

titleistconceptclubsThe new Titleist Concept Clubs initiative provides an avenue to showcase highly innovative technologies, ultra-premium materials, advanced construction methods and cosmetic treatments that result from this rigorous, ongoing R&D process, the company said. Concept Clubs can also provide golfers a glimpse into the future, as Concept product technology may (or may not) transition into next generation in-line Titleist products. By their nature, Concept Clubs are super premium and released in extremely limited quantity (in the U.S. only). So while it isn’t necessarily intended to be a growth platform in terms of revenue possibilities, it could quite easily become a testing/proving ground for something that may be in a future Titleist product. Meanwhile, don’t be surprised if this topic enjoys a considerable amount of buzz. For example, the Titleist Concept C16 Driver is carrying a minimum advertised price of $999. Factor in the taxman and its well over a grand. Titleist said it will only produce 1,500 drivers.

The equipment business and especially the retail sector have been challenged with respect to price expansion throughout the years. The limited quantities will undoubtedly go fast, in part since the volume isn’t that significant relative to the overall market. Golf still possesses some early adopters, the kind that have to be the first to have something and Titleist also enjoys a strong following of “serious” players. In the instance of Titleist Concept Clubs, fitting is a necessity, but not mandatory. The company isn’t looking to create a new category in the equipment space, according to Titleist officials. In fact, its R&D department is said to be extremely optimistic that it can increase the distance recreational players hit the ball. Titleist also has 1,000 sets of C16 irons that it will be selling. The minimum advertised price is $2,699 (set of 8, steel), $2,999 (set of 8, graphite), which will immediately eliminate many from considering it. According to VP of Golf Club Marketing, Josh Talge, the C16 irons can play one club longer than Titleist’s AP1s with the same loft. The C16 line will never see the light of day at retail. But it will generate word of mouth by those who elect to give them a try. “Titleist is about performance,” said VP of Golf Club Marketing, Josh Talge. “Titleist is also about innovation.”

In conjunction somewhat with this super premium product introduction, the company is starting on April 28 (on consecutive Thursdays for two months), Titleist Thursdays. It is providing some of its product experts at facilities nationwide to conduct club fittings, offer product trial, and answer questions. Consumers can sign up for a free fitting of Titleist metals, irons, or wedges or try the entire Titleist golf club lineup including potentially the C16s. All of the fittings will be conducted with Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls and data will be collected with TrackMan ball flight monitors. So for anyone interested in taking the latest Titleist metals, irons or wedges out for a test drive, they may discover the C16 driver or irons might enter into the conversation. Sign ups are available on a first come first serve basis as well as walk-ups are welcome.

 

It is an iconic moment from an iconic tournament. Its been 30 years since Jack Nicklaus won his final green jacket. Golf’s greatest comeback in a major, which saw the Golden Bear go 7 under over 9 holes to take the lead from Seve Ballesteros and win his 18th major. Soundwaves Art Foundation partnered with St. Andrews Legacy to celebrate this iconic moment in golf. A limited number of prints are still remaining. 

The artwork captures the sound waves of the crowd as Jack holes his putt on the 17th green to secure his record breaking 18th major. The canvas print is 24 inches high by 30 inches wide and each has been signed by Jack Nicklaus in the center bottom portion of the canvas.

St Andrews Legacy is considering all offers on the remaining prints. Those bidding on the remaining prints can purchase with confidence knowing their authenticity and that Jack Nicklaus is fully supportive of St Andrews Legacy. Offers are being accepted until the final putt is holed on Sunday of the 2016 Masters with emails promised on Monday advising if the offers have been accepted. For those interested in making an offer click here

 

Many times its been said you learn more from losing than winning. In golf that means players have frequent opportunities to learn from their mistakes. However, the game also allows people to observe and learn from others. With The Masters coming up this week, a lot of people will look to today’s stars such as  McIlroy, Spieth, and past green jacket winning legends like The Golden Bear to get tips for their business on and off the course. So what do today’s top business executives and entrepreneurs have to learn from Jack Nicklaus’s golf swing? Plenty, according to bestselling author Dr. Henry Cloud, whose latest book, The Power of the Other: The Startling Effect Other People Have on You, from the Boardroom to the Bedroom and Beyond—And What to Do About It (HarperCollins Publishers, $27.99), draws some of its most important lessons from, “the greatest golfer the world has ever known.”

A familiar face and voice to millions of readers, TV viewers, and radio listeners, Dr. Cloud—co-author of the bestselling Boundaries series—has written over 40 books and sold more than 10 million books worldwide. He is a frequent guest on national news programs, and has a syndicated radio show that airs in over 200 markets. In The Power of the Other, Dr. Cloud considers Nicklaus as, “the embodiment of the essence of performance,” and a supreme practitioner of self-control, ownership, and responsibility. In a chapter titled “Freedom and Control,” Dr. Cloud analyzes Nicklaus’s legendary, 218-yard shot at the seventeenth hole of the 1972 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach to animate some of his most insightful ideas about leadership and performance.

Whether you’re an athlete, a business executive, a military officer, or a parent, The Power of the Other is a book that offers practical guidance to improving performance, health, and well-being. 

 

Nike Golf has staked its territory in the ball category on the back of RZN technology. It turns out the company has found additional nikemethodapplications for the material. It has branched out into putters as Nike Golf found it delivers performance enhancements not only to ball but club. “When we design a putter, our entire goal is to make the putter an extension of the athlete. We want them to step onto the green without even considering the putter in their hands, but rather just be thinking about getting the ball in the hole,” stated David Franklin, Nike Golf Master Modelmaker.

According to the company, engineers created a classic-looking blade putter filled with integrated RZN. RZN is a family of materials also used in the Nike RZN golf balls. In the case of the new putter, they employed a unique construction comprising three pieces: the face, a secondary mass on the back and a RZN layer compressed in-between. Together, these pieces form the Nike Method Origin putter that has already recorded four global wins in the hands of Rory McIlroy and Charl Schwartzel, who is currently averaging 1.3 fewer putts per round this season (28.9) compared to 2015 (30.2) on the European Tour. The compliant RZN layer is activated on off-center hits, returning energy to the golf ball within the contact nikemethod2time. “The response is incremental across the face. A hit on the center of the face elicits a dampening effect,” Franklin explained. “The more off-center the hit, the more the RZN compresses and the more energy is returned to the ball. The response is similar to our Compression Channel and improves consistency across the face.”

Insights from Woods and McIlroy, according to Nike who put the putter into play at the 2015 Tour Championship, pushed Franklin and team to make the putter roll more efficiently. They completely reengineered the polymetal groove technology to offer full-length grooves that are linear from heel to toe. This orientation is designed to provide a more consistent, efficient and faster forward roll. “When I first tested it in Dubai in January 2015, I realized the long putts kept rolling just a little bit more. It just kept rolling and rolling, which was awesome,” McIlroy stated. “Then I tested again at Sage Valley in April 2015 and loved it. From that point I kept asking, 'When can I get this in the bag?' I added it in September 2015 and it has been in the bag ever since.”

The newly designed face features twice the number of polymetal grooves of previous Method putters, Nike said. More grooves means increased coefficient of friction and traction on the golf ball, creating earlier forward roll and a smoother, softer feel at impact. “I love the new grooves,” McIlroy said. “The roll was perfect and I felt like the contact was so much softer than my previous putter; it got the ball rolling so much quicker.”
Available in two models, the B1-01 and B2-01, the Method Origin putter is already in the bag of McIlroy (B2-01), Schwartzel (B1-01), Russell Henley (B2-01), Scott Pinckney (B1-01), Ryan Ruffels (B1-01), Nick Watney (B2-01), Lucas Bjerregard (B1-01) and Ross Fisher (B2-01). The Nike Method Origin putter will be available beginning April 22 at nike.com and select retailers. It is priced at $349 and $419 (with CounterFlex).

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Odyssey considers itself the leader in putter innovation. The company is hoping consumers will give a thumbs up to its new Toe Up putters. Odyssey reported it has used Stroke Balanced technology to reduce torque during the stroke for minimal twisting. The result, it said, is it’s going to be much easier to toeupputterget the face back to square. In order to accomplish this, Odyssey said it has strategically placed more weight towards the face to balance the putter, and the center of gravity is aligned with the center of the face. All this is designed to promote a more consistent stroke, and when you put your finger up to the face, you’ll see that it balances toe up, which makes it unique to any other putter in the market.

The new Toe Up putters also feature Odyssey’s Metal-X face is fly cut face so that it’s perfectly flat and it’s chemically etched, which leads to a pure roll. Its hi-def alignment, three white lines featured in its Marxman family, also highlights the proper address over the ball. To aid in minimal twisting, it also features the Superstroke Flatso 1.0 grip and the new Counter Core technology. Weights can be purchased at your local retailer, Odyssey said.

“The whole idea behind the Toe Up putter is it’s in of a smaller blade-style putter, to reduce the torque feeling in the hands,” said Odyssey Chief Designer, Austie Rollinson. “We did this years ago in a putter we called Back Strike, which was a big mallet. We designed the shaft and shaft axis to be more in line with the center of gravity so there wasn’t any torque added to the hands. This is now being done with a smaller blade style putter. Any type of torque that you get in the hands when your stroking it, if you have a straight back, straight through, you’re not gong to be as sensitive of when it opens and closes. Torque cam make you change your grip pressure or change how you rotate it back and forth and it may cause inconsistencies in the stroke.”

 
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