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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 147                                                       
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “The irony of it, it could be the place of my first win and my last win.”

p2

BRAIN TEASER: In fact, since 1994, only one player has been victorious at Firestone Country Club's South Course who hadn't won, or didn't go on to win, a major championship. Can you name the only player that hasn’t accomplished it yet?

CASE CLOSED: Cleveland Golf /Srixon /XXIO reported it has settled its legal dispute with Callaway Golf over usage of the Roger Cleveland name. The case, which is captioned Roger Cleveland Golf Company, Inc., et al. v. Callaway Golf Company, Case No. 8:13-cv-01642-AG-RNB, was pending in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, and had been filed last year. The terms of the settlement are confidential.

“We are pleased with the settlement terms,” said Todd Harman, President of Cleveland Golf/Srixon /XXIO – U.S.A. “At Cleveland Golf, Srixon, and XXIO, we are proud of our heritage, our innovations, as well as world class Cleveland Golf, Srixon and XXIO branded golf products, and the intellectual property rights associated with them. And we stand ready to protect and enforce those intellectual property rights whenever we deem it necessary or appropriate.”

cgbanner

ANOTHER BERTHA! Just last week, the Callaway Big Bertha V Series driver was added to the USGA conforming list. Today, we spotted the driver on tour at the 2014 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. READ MORE>>>

SOMETHING NEW? While utility patent applications are often pie-in-the-sky dreams of designs and technologies that may never make it to the market, design patent applications are generally directly correlated with a product that is coming to market (or got canned at very last minute). This makes two design patents that issued this week to Cobra Golf very interesting. READ MORE>>>

TIME FORE CHANGE? The concept of iron adjustability is nothing new, but the major manufacturers are adding their own spin on the concept and seeking patent protection. Apparently Callaway also has some interest in adjustable irons, as exhibited by a patent that issued last week. READ MORE>>>

SCORING, PRESENTED BY CLEVELAND GOLF: How did he do it? That might be a question on the mind of Jim Furyk after Tim Clark won the RBC Canadian Open. Clark  entered the final round of the RBC Canadian Open trailing Furyk by three strokes, stumbled out of the gate with a bogey on the opening hole to fall four shots back. According to the PGA TOUR’s chief number cruncher, Mark Broadie, Clark won because of his superior putting and approach play.

The South African gained a total of 4.1 strokes per round on the field. The break down works this way, a gain of 1.6 strokes per round from his putting (rank 2) and 1.4 strokes per round from his approach shots (rank 8). Broadie stated Clark gained 4.2 strokes on the final nine holes compared to 6.5 strokes for the entire tournament. His back-nine putting featured seven one-putts: from 5 feet (hole 10, gain 0.3 versus the field), 25 feet (hole 11, gain 0.9), 6 feet (hole 12, gain 0.3), 6 feet (hole 14, gain 0.3), 10 feet (hole 15, gain 0.6), 11 feet (hole 16, gain 0.7), and 15 feet (hole 17, gain 0.8).  Furyk, on the other hand, lost 1.4 strokes with his putting over the same stretch of holes.

For some context on Clark’s performance, consider the following: He had missed eight cuts in 14 events since January, but tied for fifth at the John Deere Classic two weeks ago. For the season, Clark ranks 98th on TOUR with his 0.2 strokes gained per round stat  on the field. He won by playing 3.9 strokes per round better than his season average, with improvements in every part of his game. “I just got hot with the putter on that back nine, obviously, and to stand over that putt and still feel confident was very nice,” Clark said after his win. “I didn't quite have it with my golf swing or the putter, but making the turn I was still only three back, so I was still in the tournament, and I knew it looked like Jim wasn't going to make any mistakes. He played pretty solid today, so I knew I had to make birdies, and sometimes that can be easier when you know you have to be aggressive. At that point nothing to lose, and like I say, I suddenly just got hot, and I went with it.”

Clark acknowledged the impending putter rule, set to take effect in 2016, has weighed on his mind. “If you looked at my stats this year, I was 130 in putts coming into these last few weeks. So it hasn't been that great. I think that's probably been on my mind for the last couple years, knowing that the change is coming, and every time I'm home I'm tinkering with stuff, seeing what I'm going to do,” he said. “I think that's taken away from my play. The last month or so I've stopped doing that. I've just stuck to what I'm doing and tried to get it out of my mind and I've kind of put it to the back now. I'm going to just go with what I've got now and maybe give it more thought sometime next year.”

To see a strokes gained breakdown of the top 11 finishers at last week’s RBC Canadian Open, click here.

WEB GEMS:

BACK ON TRACK: Jarrod Lyle has walked away from his first US golf tournament since being diagnosed with cancer for a second time a proud man. The Australian fired a two-under 69 in the final round of the Web.com Tour's Midwest Classic in Kansas on Sunday to finish tied for 11th, eight shots behind winner Zack Sucher. "I'd give myself an A, probably an A-minus," he said. "I didn't really get many of those in school so I'm happy with it. I'm ecstatic with the way the week has gone. Better than expected." READ MORE>>>

NOT A QUITTER: Believe it or not, there was a time when Rory McIlroy decided he didn’t want to pursue a career in professional golf. It lasted all of three days. “I was ready to give it up when I was 16,” he recalled Tuesday in advance of this week’s WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. “I remember the drive. I just won the Mullingar Scratch Cup, and I remember the drive home with my dad. It was like a three‑hour drive. And I said to him, ‘I don't like this anymore. I don't enjoy it. I just won, and I don't know, I'm not happy, I'm not excited.’” READ MORE>>>

ONE AT A TIME: “It’s not something I ever thought about or dreamed of,” McIlroy told a pre-tournament press conference on the eve of the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational in Akron, Ohio. “The next number in my head is four. “I’ve won three and would like to win my fourth and just try and keep going like that, one after the other and whatever number it adds up to at the end of my career is great. I don’t want to put that pressure on myself, that burden of a number to try and attain.” READ MORE>>>

allstarANSWERS: “The irony of it, it could be the place of my first win and my last win.”--Tim Clark after his win at the RBC Canadian Open. His first professional victory also came in Canada, New Brunswick Open.

Hunter Mahan is the only player since 1994, that has been victorious at Firestone Country Club's South Course but hasn't won a major championship. Since 1999, Firestone Golf Club has crowned more winners with major championship victories than any other tournament on the PGA TOUR.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

 

ad3

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 147                                                       
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “The irony of it, it could be the place of my first win and my last win.”

p2

BRAIN TEASER: In fact, since 1994, only one player has been victorious at Firestone Country Club's South Course who hadn't won, or didn't go on to win, a major championship. Can you name the only player that hasn’t accomplished it yet?

CASE CLOSED: Cleveland Golf /Srixon /XXIO reported it has settled its legal dispute with Callaway Golf over usage of the Roger Cleveland name. The case, which is captioned Roger Cleveland Golf Company, Inc., et al. v. Callaway Golf Company, Case No. 8:13-cv-01642-AG-RNB, was pending in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, and had been filed last year. The terms of the settlement are confidential.

“We are pleased with the settlement terms,” said Todd Harman, President of Cleveland Golf/Srixon /XXIO – U.S.A. “At Cleveland Golf, Srixon, and XXIO, we are proud of our heritage, our innovations, as well as world class Cleveland Golf, Srixon and XXIO branded golf products, and the intellectual property rights associated with them. And we stand ready to protect and enforce those intellectual property rights whenever we deem it necessary or appropriate.”

cgbanner

ANOTHER BERTHA! Just last week, the Callaway Big Bertha V Series driver was added to the USGA conforming list. Today, we spotted the driver on tour at the 2014 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. READ MORE>>>

SOMETHING NEW? While utility patent applications are often pie-in-the-sky dreams of designs and technologies that may never make it to the market, design patent applications are generally directly correlated with a product that is coming to market (or got canned at very last minute). This makes two design patents that issued this week to Cobra Golf very interesting. READ MORE>>>

TIME FORE CHANGE? The concept of iron adjustability is nothing new, but the major manufacturers are adding their own spin on the concept and seeking patent protection. Apparently Callaway also has some interest in adjustable irons, as exhibited by a patent that issued last week. READ MORE>>>

SCORING, PRESENTED BY CLEVELAND GOLF: How did he do it? That might be a question on the mind of Jim Furyk after Tim Clark won the RBC Canadian Open. Clark  entered the final round of the RBC Canadian Open trailing Furyk by three strokes, stumbled out of the gate with a bogey on the opening hole to fall four shots back. According to the PGA TOUR’s chief number cruncher, Mark Broadie, Clark won because of his superior putting and approach play.

The South African gained a total of 4.1 strokes per round on the field. The break down works this way, a gain of 1.6 strokes per round from his putting (rank 2) and 1.4 strokes per round from his approach shots (rank 8). Broadie stated Clark gained 4.2 strokes on the final nine holes compared to 6.5 strokes for the entire tournament. His back-nine putting featured seven one-putts: from 5 feet (hole 10, gain 0.3 versus the field), 25 feet (hole 11, gain 0.9), 6 feet (hole 12, gain 0.3), 6 feet (hole 14, gain 0.3), 10 feet (hole 15, gain 0.6), 11 feet (hole 16, gain 0.7), and 15 feet (hole 17, gain 0.8).  Furyk, on the other hand, lost 1.4 strokes with his putting over the same stretch of holes.

For some context on Clark’s performance, consider the following: He had missed eight cuts in 14 events since January, but tied for fifth at the John Deere Classic two weeks ago. For the season, Clark ranks 98th on TOUR with his 0.2 strokes gained per round stat  on the field. He won by playing 3.9 strokes per round better than his season average, with improvements in every part of his game. “I just got hot with the putter on that back nine, obviously, and to stand over that putt and still feel confident was very nice,” Clark said after his win. “I didn't quite have it with my golf swing or the putter, but making the turn I was still only three back, so I was still in the tournament, and I knew it looked like Jim wasn't going to make any mistakes. He played pretty solid today, so I knew I had to make birdies, and sometimes that can be easier when you know you have to be aggressive. At that point nothing to lose, and like I say, I suddenly just got hot, and I went with it.”

Clark acknowledged the impending putter rule, set to take effect in 2016, has weighed on his mind. “If you looked at my stats this year, I was 130 in putts coming into these last few weeks. So it hasn't been that great. I think that's probably been on my mind for the last couple years, knowing that the change is coming, and every time I'm home I'm tinkering with stuff, seeing what I'm going to do,” he said. “I think that's taken away from my play. The last month or so I've stopped doing that. I've just stuck to what I'm doing and tried to get it out of my mind and I've kind of put it to the back now. I'm going to just go with what I've got now and maybe give it more thought sometime next year.”

To see a strokes gained breakdown of the top 11 finishers at last week’s RBC Canadian Open, click here.

WEB GEMS:

BACK ON TRACK: Jarrod Lyle has walked away from his first US golf tournament since being diagnosed with cancer for a second time a proud man. The Australian fired a two-under 69 in the final round of the Web.com Tour's Midwest Classic in Kansas on Sunday to finish tied for 11th, eight shots behind winner Zack Sucher. "I'd give myself an A, probably an A-minus," he said. "I didn't really get many of those in school so I'm happy with it. I'm ecstatic with the way the week has gone. Better than expected." READ MORE>>>

NOT A QUITTER: Believe it or not, there was a time when Rory McIlroy decided he didn’t want to pursue a career in professional golf. It lasted all of three days. “I was ready to give it up when I was 16,” he recalled Tuesday in advance of this week’s WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. “I remember the drive. I just won the Mullingar Scratch Cup, and I remember the drive home with my dad. It was like a three‑hour drive. And I said to him, ‘I don't like this anymore. I don't enjoy it. I just won, and I don't know, I'm not happy, I'm not excited.’” READ MORE>>>

ONE AT A TIME: “It’s not something I ever thought about or dreamed of,” McIlroy told a pre-tournament press conference on the eve of the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational in Akron, Ohio. “The next number in my head is four. “I’ve won three and would like to win my fourth and just try and keep going like that, one after the other and whatever number it adds up to at the end of my career is great. I don’t want to put that pressure on myself, that burden of a number to try and attain.” READ MORE>>>

allstarANSWERS: “The irony of it, it could be the place of my first win and my last win.”--Tim Clark after his win at the RBC Canadian Open. His first professional victory also came in Canada, New Brunswick Open.

Hunter Mahan is the only player since 1994, that has been victorious at Firestone Country Club's South Course but hasn't won a major championship. Since 1999, Firestone Golf Club has crowned more winners with major championship victories than any other tournament on the PGA TOUR.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

ad3

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 147                                                       
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “The irony of it, it could be the place of my first win and my last win.”

 

 

ad3

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 146                                                       
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I had to get my course record back. In '01 I had the course record for a day and then (Scott) Verplank and (David) Morland beat me the next day, so to tie them, to go back and get it, I'm pretty happy about that. I was thinking about it on 18, too, which is an idiotic thing to do, but I made the putt anyway.”

 

 

ad3

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 146                                                       
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I had to get my course record back. In '01 I had the course record for a day and then (Scott) Verplank and (David) Morland beat me the next day, so to tie them, to go back and get it, I'm pretty happy about that. I was thinking about it on 18, too, which is an idiotic thing to do, but I made the putt anyway.”

 
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