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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 89                                                         
Thursday, May 5, 2016

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I think I wasted my talent in the '90s, especially towards the later part of the '90s. All the money was coming in, and I didn't work hard enough at it. I didn't do the right things to prepare myself to win golf tournaments. You know, that's definitely on me, and I admit that. But that's just not the case anymore. I'm just kind of a grinder now, but I think my mental attitude is 10 times better than it was in the '90s.”

p2

BRAIN TEASER: He has never won the Wells Fargo Championship, but has made the most birdies and is the most under par in the 48 rounds he’s played. Can you name who it is?

FIRST QUARTER BLUES: TaylorMade adidas Golf reported first quarter sales of 275 million euros, down 5 million euros from the first quarter of 2015. On a currency neutral basis, sales slipped by 1.7% for the reporting period, adidas said. This happened despite the success of M1, according to TaylorMade and the introduction of M2 drivers, fairway and Rescue clubs. In March, adidas CEO, Herbert Hainer, reported glowingly on M1. “We have seen extremely good response to our latest product launches. In its inaugural week on both the PGA Tour and the European Tour, TaylorMade’s M1 driver became the number one played model bringing TaylorMade back to the top spot in golf’s most important category, metalwoods,” he reported. The trouble is the professional circuits don’t buy the product; they only validate it to those who are expected to then purchase it. “Due to the strong early demand and quick sales through at retail our launch quantities were sold out quickly and much faster than we had anticipated,” Hainer said in March of 2016. Wonder if that decision is being second-guessed? According to adidas, growth at TaylorMade (6%) and adidas Golf (3%) was more than offset by double-digit sales declines at Ashworth and Adams. The company did not provide any breakdown on TMaG’s contribution to its bottom line for the quarter.

While foreign exchange rates played a role in the final numbers, it’s worth pointing out that TMaG’s sales decline was consistent with its rival Callaway Golf. Last week Callaway reported a first quarter sales decline of $10 million or 3.5% from 2015.

p3

LET’S MAKE A DEAL! Its highly likely very few have been paying close attention to the situation brewing inside adidas with regards to its golf division. In 2015 TMaG initiated a 15% reduction in its global workforce as part of an extensive restructuring program, which also involved the closure of one of its facilities in the U.S. On a currency-neutral basis, revenues at TaylorMade declined 13% last year, thanks to sales declines in most categories and in particular metalwoods and irons, the company reported. In 2014, TMaG sales plummeted by 28%. “Half way through last year we started analyzing future options for our golf business. We expect the strategic review to be concluded by the end of the first quarter of 2016,” Hainer expressed to the investment community in March.

As the company reported its first quarter operating results, it let it be known in no un-certain terms the golf business has to go. “TaylorMade is a very viable business. However, we decided that now is the time to focus even more on our core strength in the athletic footwear and apparel market,” said Herbert Hainer. “With its leadership position in the industry and the turnaround plan gaining traction, which is clearly reflected in the top- and bottom-line improvements recorded in Q1 as well as recent market share gains, I am convinced that TaylorMade offers attractive growth opportunities in the future. At the same time, the planned divestiture will allow us to reduce complexity and focus our efforts on those areas of our business that offer the highest return and where we can have the biggest impact in reaching our consumers and winning their loyalty for the Adidas and Reebok brands.” The company is actively seeking a buyer for the remainder of its golf business, which mainly consists of the TaylorMade brand, as well as the Adams and Ashworth brands. The Executive Board has decided to enter into concrete negotiations with interested parties aimed at a divestiture of parts of the company’s golf division.  A final decision including the detailed terms of a potential agreement is subject to approval by the Supervisory Board.

The rumor mill is now open for business. Many will speculate on the fate of TaylorMade with little to no information to substantiate it. Its somewhat fitting in today’s world after all. Nevertheless, a few points are worth highlighting. First and foremost, price is the critical element in the deal. John Guy, an analyst at MainFirst, has estimated that the TaylorMade, Adams and Ashworth brands could be worth roughly 470 million euros.

The second quarter is already underway and TMaG has seen its sales contract significantly from 3-5 years ago. While TaylorMade saw an uptick in its specific sales in its first quarter, it doesn’t make a year and therefore any interested party will likely wish for further visibility into the second quarter in order to price its offer accordingly. History has shown the second half of the calendar year is a cash drain and while the Germans would like to see this deal happen sooner than later, patience would be a wise first step. Therefore, its unlikely the seller can demand the price it believes its worth.

taylormadeKeep in mind; adidas understand its golf assets better than anyone else. While the competition has intimate knowledge of TMaG from a competitive standpoint, it doesn’t have access to its financials or what it takes to make those numbers happen. The fact that adidas is willing to sell TaylorMade, thus reducing its exposure in golf, shouldn’t be overlooked.

The ultimate question is which TaylorMade are you buying? At one time, not that long ago, sales defied gravity. In the past few years, sales have spiraled downward? There are extenuating reasons for both scenarios, yet can or will TMaG return to its prominence? Who will lead the charge to the Promised Land, for the next owner of the company? This should go hand in hand with its future direction.

The equipment business has been having a tough time of it lately. Signs have appeared the overall size of the market has been contracting, which is worrisome to the next owner of the company and specifically the price ultimately paid. As noted in the May 2nd issue of the Web Street Golf Report, Callaway has been boasting hard good market share gains, despite seeing its revenues, including domestically, decline, again and again. Meanwhile Callaway booked a pre-tax gain of $18 million in the second quarter of 2016 on a partial sale of its investment in Topgolf. In 2015, Callaway made $14.5 million for the entire year! In 2014, it was $16 million from its ongoing operations! Going off those financial performances alone, business in general can be questioned. The next person to lead TaylorMade must have a vision for the company but also where it fits within the industry, which many insiders believe has reached a stage of maturity.

TaylorMade is a viable company and one that should sell. It likely won’t go for the highest price, but it leaves those that are currently working there in an unenviable position. No one will know for sure whether they have a job long term and it could force some to start looking in the short term elsewhere. The long and short of it (pun intended), is that it’s a major distraction for as long as it takes for a sale to be agreed upon. Golf has entered its selling season for equipment, even if the weatherman hasn’t been too kind to many parts of the United States. Execution is currently the name of the game and this could have an indirect damaging effect.

THE GAME WITHIN THE GAME: The field on the (infamous) Green Mile is a combined +5,557 over par since 2003 at Quail Hollow Club. It is the most over par of any final 3-holes on the PGA TOUR. For comparison, the combined score to par for the field in all 4 majors in both 2014 and 2015 was +4,212. The Green Mile accounts for 25% of all bogeys, 38% of all doubles, and 51.2% of all triples or worse at Quail Hollow Club since 2003. While, the field is a combined +5,557 over par on holes 16 thru 18 since 2003, it is -1,372 on all other holes.

The Green Mile was the toughest 3-hole closing stretch on the PGA TOUR in 2005, 2009, 2010, 2014 & 2015. It was the second toughest 3-hole closing stretch in 2004, 2006-2008, 2012 and again in 2013. These 3 holes have never ranked outside the top-3 toughest on the PGA TOUR.

WEB GEMS:

MCILROY LOOKS FOR A WIN: “I've got three important weeks coming up for me. There's a couple of things at Augusta that I need to rectify but I feel I've done that for the most part and it's always great to come back to somewhere where I've got good memories.” READ MORE>>>

BIG TEST IS COMING: "I know that if you win a U.S. Open at Oakmont, you can go ahead and say that you've conquered the hardest test in all of golf," Spieth said. "Because this is arguably the hardest course in America day to day." READ MORE>>>

WHAT THE OTHER HALF THINKS: It’s probably no shock to learn that most US golfers tend to vote Republican – but the strength of ill feeling towards Hillary Clinton is perhaps more surprising, particularly among the women of the LPGA. Oh, and the game’s greats also like Donald Trump – and think Tiger Woods will win again. The revelations come from Sports Illustrated’s annual anonymous pro tour survey, published on Tuesday, where golfers can sound off on multiple topics without being unmasked. SI polled more than 150 players across three American tours, and, unsurprisingly, a strongly Republican bent emerged from the survey. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I think I wasted my talent in the '90s, especially towards the later part of the '90s. All the money was coming in, and I didn't work hard enough at it. I didn't do the right things to prepare myself to win golf tournaments. You know, that's definitely on me, and I admit that. But that's just not the case anymore. I'm just kind of a grinder now, but I think my mental attitude is 10 times better than it was in the '90s.”--John Daly.

In 48 rounds at Quail Hollow Club, Phil Mickelson has the most birdies with 215. He has 42 more birdies than the next best player (Geoff Ogilvy) with 173. In Mickelson’s 48 rounds, he has carded 19 rounds in the 60’s, the most at this event. He is a combined 87 under par at the Wells Fargo and yet to break into the winner’s circle. He has 8 top 10’s in his 12 appearances at the Wells Fargo Championship and hasn’t finished worse than T-35th (2006).

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 88                                                         
Wednesday, May 4, 2016

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I'm really excited, one, to make it to 50, and two, just to be able to have kind of a home to play again. It's been pretty tough the last few years not knowing where I'm going to play and waiting by the phone on exemptions and stuff, and now that I have sort of a category here that I can play a few years out here and get a schedule going and play a lot of golf, it's going to be good for me.”

p2

BRAIN TEASER: Only one player has ever won the Wells Fargo Championship more than once. Who did it?

MORE THAN ONE WAY TO SKIN A CAT: The beauty of golf is that is can be played many different ways. The game within the game is that we are always competing against ourselves. At times we fool ourselves by thinking it’s the course or our opponent that we are challenged by. Nevertheless, the game offers a lifetime of challenges and opportunities. “Jack (Nicklaus) always said golf should be called patience. I say golf should be called putting because it's putting that wins the golf tournament,” says Gary Player. Brain Stuard certainly supported Player’s opinion, as he was a perfect 46/46 from inside 10 feet, including the playoff at last week’s rain soaked Zurich Classic. His first PGA TOUR win was delivered in part by an Odyssey Works Marxman Fang Tank Putter, which he picked up on the putting green the week before the Zurich. “I picked it up off the putting green and it felt good in my hands. I felt like I was really seeing the lines well, and they were going in. I don't know. I wish I knew what the difference was. But it was a nice feeling,” he said afterwards.

Unfortunately for many recreational players, golf is often Einstein’s definition of madness: Doing the same thing over and over again and each time expecting different results. Some, if not many reading this might not ever have heard the name Frank Fornari. But his company believes it has a quantifiable solution to putting, which by most accounts is at least half the game! “If your golf equipment doesn’t make you play and feel better replace it,” says Fornari. His expertise is in physiology, anatomy, genetics, physics, biomechanics, and the study of motion, which provided the driving force behind BioMech, a different kind of sports and fitness company.

In every rotational sport, think baseball (both throwing and hitting), tennis, hockey, and any other activity in which the basic motion involves turning, especially the upper body, the motion is controlled by the body’s core. Your hands may hold the baseball and you might move your arm to throw it, but the stability and, most importantly the POWER is provided from the core.

p3

In almost every sport, the hands and arms have a definite, but limited, role: connection. They link the core, your power source, to the tool. And as nothing more than connectors, they should remain as loose as possible, allowing all the power generated by the upper body to transfer into the golf club, including the putter! Traditional putting forces the body to bend over, keeps the core stiff, and relies on the small (sometimes twitchy) muscles in the arms and hands to control the stroke. There are many other scientific principles at work in, or in the case of most golfers, working against, putting.

Players move with their eyes. Yet, we walk with our eyes looking straight ahead just as we do when we drive a vehicle.  But when we putt, we stare at the target, make our mental calculations, and then position our bodies so our eyes, which we just used to plan the ensuing motion, are turned 90 degrees away from the target. Does that make sense?

Fornari, founder and CEO of BioMech Sports, is also a scientist. He’s dedicated to designing, developing, manufacturing, and distributing innovative golf equipment that will enrich every golfer’s playing experience. Utilizing functional and clinical anatomy, physiology, and physics to optimize movements, Fornari was able to optimize the ‘BIO’ in the BioMechanics of golf, which, he believes, relies too heavily on engineering, materials science, and a devotion to the game’s traditions. His belief is that a person’s swing should be in harmony with, and derived from, their anatomy and physiology. This method of development facilitates a consistent, biomechanically sound swing and led to the creation of the company’s first putter, the AccuLock ACE. “With golf or any sport the goal is to adjust to the changes caused by aging, injury, disease, behavior, and other factors while optimizing the activity, enhancing our health, and having fun,” said Fornari.

His company has developed the AccuLock ACE putter and with it the advent of the core putting stroke. Designed over a six-year period to match the biomechanics of the human body, the ACE, in the words of its inventor Dr. Frank Fornari, makes it “hard to miss.”

The putter is much longer than what most golfers are used to because it is meant to rest against the forearm and be used from a much more erect body position. The golfer stands tall, which is better for the back and eliminates muscle tension throughout the body. The putter is available in lengths of 37”, 39”, 41”, 43”, 45” and 47” (the last comes uncut; a grip is included but not attached). The different lengths also act as a fitting device since not everyone is the same height.

The shaft comes out of the putter head at an approximate 12-degree forward angle, which when gripped properly sets the golfer in a more athletic position—standing tall, knees slightly flexed, the shoulders at a corresponding 12-degree angle (the leading shoulder is slightly higher than the trailing shoulder). BioMech said it studied this angle across many sports and found that it is almost always approximately 12 degrees. The shaft angle makes it easier to get into the correct position every time, yielding more consistent strokes. So the ACE putter was designed to set golfers in the biomechanically optimal position facilitating the proper rotational movement of the core, which minimizes the stroke arc, creating a straighter stroke that produces straighter putts. Besides helping create the optimal 12-degree angles, moving the shaft to the back of the head allows the golfer to see the entire face of the putter. With a traditional putter, some of the face is blocked by the shaft, making it harder to view proper alignment. BioMech tested face alignment with more than 100 golfers, including touring and teaching pros as well as amateurs. When asked to line up their putters at the hole, the average aim was approximately a cup-width off to either side of the hole. With the ACE, the same group averaged less than one ball-width to either side. Doing nothing else, the ACE putter makes aim and alignment much easier.

The top of the putter head is curved, has a hole in the middle, and is etched with two scoring lines. When the golfer gets into the correct set-up—standing tall and able to look both down the putting line and down at the ball—there is only one spot when those two lines form a perfect “T.” At that point, the golfer’s dominant eye is precisely over the hole in the middle of the head and the shoulders, wrists, knees, hips, feet, ankles, and every other part of the body are in the same spot every time. So not only is the face aimed precisely at the target, but the golfer’s body is in the same position with each and every putt, according to Fornari. When the body is in position, with the hands gripping the putter and the shaft leaning against the inside of the leading forearm, there is only one way to make the stroke: with the core of the body. So this is the only part of the motion that the golfer has to learn and practice, how much core motion is necessary. And it’s an amazingly small amount, according to Fornari. Since the energy is coming from the big muscles and mass of the core, and the putter is in the ideal, if not perfect position, just a little bit of balanced movement will roll the ball a long way. This translates into the easiest way to efficiently and consistently roll long and short putts. This produces much more control than traditional putting that relies on acceleration of the relatively much smaller mass of the arms and usually forces golfers to cock their wrists and swing their arms and hands at the ball—and producing bad and inconsistent strokes.

Dr. Fornari and his team said they have analyzed thousands of putting strokes with real golfers, from touring pros to beginners, on greens around the country and the results are telling. With their own putter and the traditional method, golfers begin with the face open 2 degrees to the right. With the ACE putter, the face is 0.1 degree open to the right. With their own putter, the face direction was 2.6 degrees open to the right. With the ACE, it was 0.1 degree open to the right. Tracing the paths of their traditional putters shows all sorts of movement inside and outside the line, both back and through. With the ACE, the strokes paths are uniformly straight back and through. With the ACE, the stroke is accelerated through the ball stroke at 810 milliseconds, compared to 1100 milliseconds with a traditional putter. The conclusion from the field research with real players is that golfers putting with the AccuLock Putting System are better able to maintain balance and speed throughout the entire stroke.

On a side note, BioMech is partnering with American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA) to reengage golfers and enhance the joy of the game to players impacted by Parkinson’s. By virtue of its contact against the golfer’s leading forearm, the AccuLock ACE facilitates a simpler, natural core putting motion. An upright, balanced stance helps to control and stabilize the stroke, thus eliminating unwanted and uncontrollable motion in the small muscles of the hands, wrists, and arms. As a result, the ACE gives Parkinsonians (and all golfers) improved putting control.

“I’ve spent the majority of my life dedicated to science and motion analysis. I’ve applied my background now into putting analysis. The putters we have are solutions to these equations and are empirically driven,” said Dr. Fornari. He claims he hasn’t 3-putted in the last four years. “Let’s stay happy, there is enough bad stuff in life,” he added. So if you haven’t been making enough putts or proving Einstein’s theory correct, consider an alternative method. You just might have more fun!

WEB GEMS:

LIFE IS BIGGER THAN GOLF: Former British Open champion Stewart Cink says he is taking a break from golf after learning his wife has breast cancer. READ MORE>>>

TIMING IS EVERYTHING: Jordan Spieth said Tuesday that he has moved on from his collapse last month at the Masters and is now getting his game ready for the U.S. Open in six weeks. "I'm not taking it very hard," Spieth told reporters at a FedEx Cares event in Pennsylvania. "I have ladies at grocery stores coming up and putting their hand on me and going: 'I'm really praying for you. How are you doing.' And I'm like, 'My dog didn't die, I'm doing OK.' I'll survive; it happens. It was unfortunate timing.” READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I'm really excited, one, to make it to 50, and two, just to be able to have kind of a home to play again. It's been pretty tough the last few years not knowing where I'm going to play and waiting by the phone on exemptions and stuff, and now that I have sort of a category here that I can play a few years out here and get a schedule going and play a lot of golf, it's going to be good for me.”--John Daly on joining the Champions Tour.

Returning to the site of his maiden PGA TOUR title, Rory McIlroy broke his own course record with a third-round 11-under 61 and shattered the 72-hole scoring record with his 21-under 267 winning total for a seven-stroke victory in 2015. He is the first repeat winner of the Wells Fargo Championship.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

ad3

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 88                                                         
Wednesday, May 4, 2016

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I'm really excited, one, to make it to 50, and two, just to be able to have kind of a home to play again. It's been pretty tough the last few years not knowing where I'm going to play and waiting by the phone on exemptions and stuff, and now that I have sort of a category here that I can play a few years out here and get a schedule going and play a lot of golf, it's going to be good for me.”

p2

BRAIN TEASER: Only one player has ever won the Wells Fargo Championship more than once. Who did it?

MORE THAN ONE WAY TO SKIN A CAT: The beauty of golf is that is can be played many different ways. The game within the game is that we are always competing against ourselves. At times we fool ourselves by thinking it’s the course or our opponent that we are challenged by. Nevertheless, the game offers a lifetime of challenges and opportunities. “Jack (Nicklaus) always said golf should be called patience. I say golf should be called putting because it's putting that wins the golf tournament,” says Gary Player. Brain Stuard certainly supported Player’s opinion, as he was a perfect 46/46 from inside 10 feet, including the playoff at last week’s rain soaked Zurich Classic. His first PGA TOUR win was delivered in part by an Odyssey Works Marxman Fang Tank Putter, which he picked up on the putting green the week before the Zurich. “I picked it up off the putting green and it felt good in my hands. I felt like I was really seeing the lines well, and they were going in. I don't know. I wish I knew what the difference was. But it was a nice feeling,” he said afterwards.

Unfortunately for many recreational players, golf is often Einstein’s definition of madness: Doing the same thing over and over again and each time expecting different results. Some, if not many reading this might not ever have heard the name Frank Fornari. But his company believes it has a quantifiable solution to putting, which by most accounts is at least half the game! “If your golf equipment doesn’t make you play and feel better replace it,” says Fornari. His expertise is in physiology, anatomy, genetics, physics, biomechanics, and the study of motion, which provided the driving force behind BioMech, a different kind of sports and fitness company.

In every rotational sport, think baseball (both throwing and hitting), tennis, hockey, and any other activity in which the basic motion involves turning, especially the upper body, the motion is controlled by the body’s core. Your hands may hold the baseball and you might move your arm to throw it, but the stability and, most importantly the POWER is provided from the core.

p3

In almost every sport, the hands and arms have a definite, but limited, role: connection. They link the core, your power source, to the tool. And as nothing more than connectors, they should remain as loose as possible, allowing all the power generated by the upper body to transfer into the golf club, including the putter! Traditional putting forces the body to bend over, keeps the core stiff, and relies on the small (sometimes twitchy) muscles in the arms and hands to control the stroke. There are many other scientific principles at work in, or in the case of most golfers, working against, putting.

Players move with their eyes. Yet, we walk with our eyes looking straight ahead just as we do when we drive a vehicle.  But when we putt, we stare at the target, make our mental calculations, and then position our bodies so our eyes, which we just used to plan the ensuing motion, are turned 90 degrees away from the target. Does that make sense?

Fornari, founder and CEO of BioMech Sports, is also a scientist. He’s dedicated to designing, developing, manufacturing, and distributing innovative golf equipment that will enrich every golfer’s playing experience. Utilizing functional and clinical anatomy, physiology, and physics to optimize movements, Fornari was able to optimize the ‘BIO’ in the BioMechanics of golf, which, he believes, relies too heavily on engineering, materials science, and a devotion to the game’s traditions. His belief is that a person’s swing should be in harmony with, and derived from, their anatomy and physiology. This method of development facilitates a consistent, biomechanically sound swing and led to the creation of the company’s first putter, the AccuLock ACE. “With golf or any sport the goal is to adjust to the changes caused by aging, injury, disease, behavior, and other factors while optimizing the activity, enhancing our health, and having fun,” said Fornari.

His company has developed the AccuLock ACE putter and with it the advent of the core putting stroke. Designed over a six-year period to match the biomechanics of the human body, the ACE, in the words of its inventor Dr. Frank Fornari, makes it “hard to miss.”

The putter is much longer than what most golfers are used to because it is meant to rest against the forearm and be used from a much more erect body position. The golfer stands tall, which is better for the back and eliminates muscle tension throughout the body. The putter is available in lengths of 37”, 39”, 41”, 43”, 45” and 47” (the last comes uncut; a grip is included but not attached). The different lengths also act as a fitting device since not everyone is the same height.

The shaft comes out of the putter head at an approximate 12-degree forward angle, which when gripped properly sets the golfer in a more athletic position—standing tall, knees slightly flexed, the shoulders at a corresponding 12-degree angle (the leading shoulder is slightly higher than the trailing shoulder). BioMech said it studied this angle across many sports and found that it is almost always approximately 12 degrees. The shaft angle makes it easier to get into the correct position every time, yielding more consistent strokes. So the ACE putter was designed to set golfers in the biomechanically optimal position facilitating the proper rotational movement of the core, which minimizes the stroke arc, creating a straighter stroke that produces straighter putts. Besides helping create the optimal 12-degree angles, moving the shaft to the back of the head allows the golfer to see the entire face of the putter. With a traditional putter, some of the face is blocked by the shaft, making it harder to view proper alignment. BioMech tested face alignment with more than 100 golfers, including touring and teaching pros as well as amateurs. When asked to line up their putters at the hole, the average aim was approximately a cup-width off to either side of the hole. With the ACE, the same group averaged less than one ball-width to either side. Doing nothing else, the ACE putter makes aim and alignment much easier.

The top of the putter head is curved, has a hole in the middle, and is etched with two scoring lines. When the golfer gets into the correct set-up—standing tall and able to look both down the putting line and down at the ball—there is only one spot when those two lines form a perfect “T.” At that point, the golfer’s dominant eye is precisely over the hole in the middle of the head and the shoulders, wrists, knees, hips, feet, ankles, and every other part of the body are in the same spot every time. So not only is the face aimed precisely at the target, but the golfer’s body is in the same position with each and every putt, according to Fornari. When the body is in position, with the hands gripping the putter and the shaft leaning against the inside of the leading forearm, there is only one way to make the stroke: with the core of the body. So this is the only part of the motion that the golfer has to learn and practice, how much core motion is necessary. And it’s an amazingly small amount, according to Fornari. Since the energy is coming from the big muscles and mass of the core, and the putter is in the ideal, if not perfect position, just a little bit of balanced movement will roll the ball a long way. This translates into the easiest way to efficiently and consistently roll long and short putts. This produces much more control than traditional putting that relies on acceleration of the relatively much smaller mass of the arms and usually forces golfers to cock their wrists and swing their arms and hands at the ball—and producing bad and inconsistent strokes.

Dr. Fornari and his team said they have analyzed thousands of putting strokes with real golfers, from touring pros to beginners, on greens around the country and the results are telling. With their own putter and the traditional method, golfers begin with the face open 2 degrees to the right. With the ACE putter, the face is 0.1 degree open to the right. With their own putter, the face direction was 2.6 degrees open to the right. With the ACE, it was 0.1 degree open to the right. Tracing the paths of their traditional putters shows all sorts of movement inside and outside the line, both back and through. With the ACE, the strokes paths are uniformly straight back and through. With the ACE, the stroke is accelerated through the ball stroke at 810 milliseconds, compared to 1100 milliseconds with a traditional putter. The conclusion from the field research with real players is that golfers putting with the AccuLock Putting System are better able to maintain balance and speed throughout the entire stroke.

On a side note, BioMech is partnering with American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA) to reengage golfers and enhance the joy of the game to players impacted by Parkinson’s. By virtue of its contact against the golfer’s leading forearm, the AccuLock ACE facilitates a simpler, natural core putting motion. An upright, balanced stance helps to control and stabilize the stroke, thus eliminating unwanted and uncontrollable motion in the small muscles of the hands, wrists, and arms. As a result, the ACE gives Parkinsonians (and all golfers) improved putting control.

“I’ve spent the majority of my life dedicated to science and motion analysis. I’ve applied my background now into putting analysis. The putters we have are solutions to these equations and are empirically driven,” said Dr. Fornari. He claims he hasn’t 3-putted in the last four years. “Let’s stay happy, there is enough bad stuff in life,” he added. So if you haven’t been making enough putts or proving Einstein’s theory correct, consider an alternative method. You just might have more fun!

WEB GEMS:

LIFE IS BIGGER THAN GOLF: Former British Open champion Stewart Cink says he is taking a break from golf after learning his wife has breast cancer. READ MORE>>>

TIMING IS EVERYTHING: Jordan Spieth said Tuesday that he has moved on from his collapse last month at the Masters and is now getting his game ready for the U.S. Open in six weeks. "I'm not taking it very hard," Spieth told reporters at a FedEx Cares event in Pennsylvania. "I have ladies at grocery stores coming up and putting their hand on me and going: 'I'm really praying for you. How are you doing.' And I'm like, 'My dog didn't die, I'm doing OK.' I'll survive; it happens. It was unfortunate timing.” READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I'm really excited, one, to make it to 50, and two, just to be able to have kind of a home to play again. It's been pretty tough the last few years not knowing where I'm going to play and waiting by the phone on exemptions and stuff, and now that I have sort of a category here that I can play a few years out here and get a schedule going and play a lot of golf, it's going to be good for me.”--John Daly on joining the Champions Tour.

Returning to the site of his maiden PGA TOUR title, Rory McIlroy broke his own course record with a third-round 11-under 61 and shattered the 72-hole scoring record with his 21-under 267 winning total for a seven-stroke victory in 2015. He is the first repeat winner of the Wells Fargo Championship.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 87                                                         
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “An Olympian should be everything that an Olympian stands for in the sense that I’m participating in one of the most important events in my life and I’ll participate through the whole process. I didn’t just come in, swim my 200m breaststroke and then go back to where I was in Miami. If you’re serious about it, come and enjoy it. But don’t say you’re an Olympian when all you’ve done is play 72 holes of golf. Then, all you are is a participant in another event. You’re not an Olympian – even if you won an Olympic gold medal. You just decided that you wanted another tick in the box and the Olympic gold medal played a part in the ego trip that you’re on.”

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BRAIN TEASER: Brian Stuard won the 2016 Zurich Classic and never made a bogey. Can you guess the last time?

CAN TIGER COME OUT TO PLAY? The guessing game has begun with respect to when Tiger Woods will return to action on the PGA TOUR. Memorial has become the betting line of sorts. What makes the topic more interesting is that the former world #1 is beginning to run out of time with regards to his exemptions into some of the majors. He is entitled to play The Masters for as long as he likes. However, the other championships carry a 10-year exemption for past winners. Woods, who is currently listed as 508 in the world rankings, won his last U.S. Open in 2008, thus granting him access to the event until 2018. Meanwhile, his last victory at the Open Championship came in 2006, which means that this is his final chance to play in it without going through the qualifying process. Otherwise, he’ll need to get his world ranking up and in a hurray to qualify in 2017.

This year the schedule is compressed to make room for the Olympics and Ryder Cup. What that means is Woods has less events available to play leading up to this year’s majors. He is eligible to play in next week’s PLAYERS, but that’s a rough one to come back to and get your feet wet. Keep in mind, whenever Woods does return the spotlight will be intense on his performance. Having gone through a dress rehearsal of sorts in 2015 when he missed the cut at Waste Management and withdrew from the Farmers, Woods knows better than anyone what he’ll be walking back into when the time comes. Therefore, in a perfect world you would like to stack the odds in your favor, if at all possible. Again the reason being is that he’ll need to scrap some rust off before showing up in a major championship, if he expects to come out on top. There are only 11 days between the end of the Open Championship and the start of this year’s PGA Championship. He could play the RBC Canadian Open, in between if he felt he needed to. But the horse may have already left the barn by that time. All of this is of course predicated on him being healthy. Let the waiting game begin.

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FIRST QUARTER IMPROVEMENT: Recreational rounds played in the United States for the month of March came in like a lion. According to research provided by Golf Datatech, an increase of 13.3% was experienced throughout the country. Public played carried the improvement as public facilities reported a 14.3% increase. Private clubs were higher by 9.3%, Datatech reported in March. Year-to-date, rounds played in the U.S. are up 5.5% on a combined basis between public and private locations.

WINNER’S CLUBS: Patience and perseverance were the keys at the 2016 Zurich Classic. It was the tournament that couldn’t get started and then needed a playoff to decide the winner. When play resumed Monday morning, the final group of the day (Brian Stuard, Jamie Lovemark, Jhonattan Vegas) were through five holes in the third (and final) round. The first group out had four holes remaining to complete their round. The last time the Zurich Classic was reduced to a 54-hole event was in 1985, when Seve Ballesteros won by two strokes over Peter Jacobsen and John Mahaffey. The last time it spilled over to Monday was 2004 when Vijay Singh defeated Phil Mickelson and Joe Ogilvie in a playoff.

Brian Stuard made a birdie-4 on the second hole of sudden death, No. 18, to claim his first career PGA TOUR title in his 120th professional TOUR start. He became the 16th player to make the Zurich Classic his first career PGA TOUR victory since 1990 and the eighth of the last 12 to do so. Conditionally exempt onto the PGA TOUR this season, Stuard finished 128th on the 2014-15 FedExCup points list. He was one of five players inside the top 125 (119th) at the beginning of last season’s Wyndham Championship that dropped out of the top 125 by week’s end to miss retaining his TOUR card and making the FedExCup Playoffs. But he is now a PGA TOUR winner. “Kind of overwhelming right now to think of all those great things that comes with winning,” he said after his win. “I just feel very fortunate, very happy, and I don't know, very pleased. I think I've always been a journeyman kind of player, just always grinded it out. I feel like I was close to getting a couple wins in México a couple years ago. Just one of those things where you just have to have the confidence to say one day it's going to be your time. Fortunately today was that day.” Here is what Brian Stuard had in the bag to win the 2016 Zurich Open:

Driver: Great Big Bertha Driver (9.5*) with a True Temper Project X-6C shaft
Fairway Metals: XR Pro Fairway Wood (14*) with a Fuji SPD VC 8.3x TS shaft 
Hybrids: Apex Hybrid (20* and 23*) with Aldila Tour Green 85 TX Hybrid shafts
Irons: New Apex Pro Irons (4-PW) with True Temper Dynamic Gold X 100 Tour shafts
Wedges: MD3 Milled Wedge (52*, 58*) with KBS Tour 610 120g X shafts 
Putter: Odyssey Works Marxman Fang Tank Putter
Ball: Titleist Pro V1x
Shoe: FJ HyperFlex shoes

Brian Stuard’s– Numbers for the week:
Eagles: 0
Birdies: 15
Pars: 39
Bogeys: 0
Double Bogeys: 0
Cumulative Score: 201

WEB GEMS:

THE NEXT ONE? A Northern Irish 13-year-old has been invited to play alongside Rory McIlroy in the pro-am before the Irish Open. “Tom McKibbin is a great talent,” said McIlroy, whose foundation is hosting the Irish Open for the second year. “I played a round with Tom in Florida recently and he is the real deal.” READ MORE>>>

A WIN IS A WIN, IS A WIN: Brian Stuard made steady golf pay off on a waterlogged course in the haunting cypress swamps outside New Orleans. The 33-year-old Stuard birdied the final hole of a largely unspectacular final round to sneak into a three-way playoff on Monday, then beat Jamie Lovemark on the second extra hole to capture his maiden PGA Tour triumph at the Zurich Classic. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “An Olympian should be everything that an Olympian stands for in the sense that I’m participating in one of the most important events in my life and I’ll participate through the whole process. I didn’t just come in, swim my 200m breaststroke and then go back to where I was in Miami. If you’re serious about it, come and enjoy it. But don’t say you’re an Olympian when all you’ve done is play 72 holes of golf. Then, all you are is a participant in another event. You’re not an Olympian – even if you won an Olympic gold medal. You just decided that you wanted another tick in the box and the Olympic gold medal played a part in the ego trip that you’re on.”--David Wilkie, 62-year-old Scot., and a winner of Olympic gold in the 200m breaststroke at Montreal in 1976. To read more of his opinion on golf in the Olympics, click here.

The last time someone won on the PGA TOUR making 0 bogeys was Lee Trevino at the 1974 Zurich Classic.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 86                                                         
Monday, May 2, 2016

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “It's her 30th birthday, so she's enjoying her time in the Bahamas. She's enjoying herself with the kids and her girlfriends down there and I'm stuck here in New Orleans with the rain. So, I mean, I'm trying not to hit the red velvet cake.”

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BRAIN TEASER: When was the last time the PGA TOUR was forced to play on a Monday?

ADAPTING TO THE EVER CHANGING WORLD: ClubCorp appears to have figured a few things out. The company recently announced its eighth straight quarter of record results. Sales are earnings were up, thanks to a strong performance in its Golf and Country Club segment. What world is it living in? Eric Affeldt, president and chief executive officer explains why his company has been seeing better days lately.

“First, we operate a predictable and stable dues-based membership business that is resilient to swings in the economy. Our focus is on operating multi-faceted private clubs, versus on dimensional daily C clubs or equity owned private clubs with no profit orientation,” he began.

“This key strategic decision makes nearly half of our revenue recurring in nature and less subject to the vagaries of weather, changes in golf trends or macroeconomic weakness.
Second, we operate clubs in economically stable neighborhoods that has stood the test of time and weathered economic downfalls. We've all heard the mantra, location, location, and location, and this adage could not be any truer of running private clubs. The location of a club is a vital strategic decision for us. We look to acquire clubs with high levels of affluence and high population density within a 10 to 15 mile radius of clubs. Our discipline in choosing clubs that meet our demographic criteria is integral to our investment rationale and critical to the success we have had with our acquisition strategy.

“Third, our competitive market is highly localized. Most of our members live near their clubs and they are most interested in the private club that has been close as proximity to them. If you look at a Google map of our clubs, you’ll see that most have few local competitors. In many cases, there are high barriers to entry limiting the ability for our competitor to build a 150-acre Greenfield club in close proximity to our clubs.

“Fourth, we offer a differentiated leisure product that resonates with the lifestyles of today’s vast affluent consumer. Our clubs appeal to multi-generational group of families or individuals who are seeking a nearby multi-faceted sports resort for recreational, leisure, and social activities. Our clubhouses become a second home, a place where members can socialize, entertain, and relax,” Affeldt continued to explain.

“Today’s trend is toward experiences, rich programming, and personal enrichment cater to the entire family. There is an overall emphasis on fitness, wellness, and fun, not just golf. We have continued to reinvent the modern club experience from a greater usage of our facilities, having completed approximately 94 dining venues, multiple fitness, tennis, pool, and aquatic amenities, and we have greatly improved our golf practice facilities, as well as our golf courses. These reinventions remain vital to our growth and have a proven track record of success. As a testament to these improvements, in 2015, same-store golf members visited their clubs on average of 58 times per year and spent an average of nearly $8,400 per year including dues. Moreover, members of our same-store reinvented golf and country clubs visited an average of 29% more frequently, than members of our non-reinvented clubs.”

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NO SALE! Castle Stuart may be preparing the “welcome back” sign as it gears up to host the Scottish Open again this summer, but it won’t be going up alongside one that says “for sale.” That’s because rumors circulating about that being the case are wide of the mark, though new investment is being sought by Mark Parsinen, the managing partner and co-designer. READ MORE>>>

WEB GEMS:

R.I.P.: Calvin Peete, whose life traced one of sport’s most triumphant arcs — a school dropout with a crooked left arm who did not pick up a golf club until his 20s, did not join the pro tour until his 30s, and still became one of the leading players of his era and the most successful black professional golfer before Tiger Woods — has died. He was 71. READ MORE>>>

HOME GROWN WIN: Li Haotong kept the China Open title in local hands for the second year in a row by conjuring up his best round of the week, a bogey-free 64, to clinch his maiden European Tour title by three shots on Sunday. READ MORE>>>

WILL HE OR WON’T HE? Tiger Woods has made accommodation plans for the Memorial tournament in Ohio, sources have told Reuters, suggesting the Jack Nicklaus-hosted event could mark the former world number one's PGA Tour return from back surgery. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “It's her 30th birthday, so she's enjoying her time in the Bahamas. She's enjoying herself with the kids and her girlfriends down there and I'm stuck here in New Orleans with the rain. So, I mean, I'm trying not to hit the red velvet cake.”--Jason Day, who missed his wife’s 30th birthday in order to play the Zurich Classic.

The Farmers Insurance Open was the last time the PGA TOUR was forced to play on a Monday. The last time the Zurich Classic was played on a Monday was 2004 when Vijay Singh defeated Phil Mickelson and Joe Ogilvie in a playoff.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 85                                                         
Friday, April 29, 2016

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “The only two things that I think about in life is my family and golf, and that's all I want to think about.”

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BRAIN TEASER: Nine players who've previous won in New Orleans are back this week, including defending champ Justin Rose. Can you name the last player to successfully defend his title in New Orleans?

FOLLOW THE BOUNCING BALL: Callaway Golf reported its products continue to increase in market share despite revenues declining. Callaway’s U.S. sales were $160 million for the first quarter of the year, down $8.6 million from a year ago or 5.1%. However, the company says it sold more products to retail, evident by its market share gains.

“Our hard goods market share for the quarter finished at 21.6%, up 100 basis points year-over-year,” stated Chip Brewer, Callaway Golf’s CEO. “This was led by the strength of our XR 16 driver, Apex irons, and our golf balls. We sustained our leadership position in clubs and strengthened our brand momentum positioning golf ball.”

Brewer drew particular attention to the golf ball segment to the investment community. “Our Green Grass business was a particular highlight for the quarter delivering double-digit year-over-year growth. We also strengthened our distribution position at Green Grass with year-over-year growth in golf ball distribution of 800 doors. Our March U.S. dollar share of 13% was the highest on record and reinforces our belief and our potential for growth in this category,” he continued.

The increased penetration at green grass for golf balls was a product of its previous successes, according to Brewer. “Our Green Grass business was a key strength for us in every category in Q1 as it was in Q3 and Q4 of last year. We had a lot of success with Supersoft when we launched it. We had a lot of success with Chrome Soft when we launched it. After we had those two successes, our pitch to go into Green Grass and motivate the pro to support us was much stronger. And so therefore you see some of these results and more people coming onboard. Our 12.2% market share for the quarter, 13% for the month of March is now our highest on record,” he reported. According to Brewer, citing Golf Datatech research, 45% of golf ball sales happen in pro shops at golf courses around the country and the majority of volume in this channel comes in the second and third quarter each year.

Callaway is the #2 selling brand in terms of market share, trailing only Titleist. Brewer told Wall Street that Bridgestone is #3 and had a 9.9% dollar share in the category.

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BUY LOW, SELL HIGH: It began in an effort to get its products in front of potentially new customers. However, Callaway Golf's financial backing in TopGolf turned out to be a wise investment, whether it influences future purchases back to the company or not. Callaway reported in its first quarter operating results it recently sold 10% of its investment in TopGolf and will see an $18 million pre-tax gain in the second quarter of 2016. Callaway still retains an approximate 15% ownership interest in TopGolf, which Chip Brewer, said is remains quite valuable. "Our minority investment in TopGolf is now beginning to publicly reveal some of its potential with an up round investment by Province which would value our remaining position at approximately $212 million. This after an $18 million pre-tax gain and $23 million cash event associated with the sale of a small portion of our investment," he said.

HOW'S THE COUNTRY CLUB BIZ? ClubCorp announced its eighth straight quarter of record results. First quarter 2016 revenue was $214.9 million, up 6.3% due to solid increases in dues, food & beverage and golf operations revenue, it said. Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization at golf and country clubs was up 11.6% $50.1 million for the reporting period on a revenue increase of $13.9 million to $172.8 million, up 8.8% versus the prior year.

"This is our eighth consecutive quarter of record financial results," said Eric Affeldt, president and chief executive officer. "Our golf and country club division delivered revenue growth in all three major revenue streams. We benefited from increased member activity across our network of clubs and improved golf and food & beverage revenue. Our results this quarter demonstrate strong member demand for our differentiated leisure product, newly reinvented clubs and our O.N.E. offering. We are confident that our three pronged growth strategy of organic growth, reinvention and acquisitions continues to deliver consistent growth and will continue to add long-term value to our members and shareholders."

Curt McClellan, chief financial officer, added " We delivered excellent adjusted EBITDA performance in our Golf and Country club division where increased member activity elevated performance. Same-store combined clubs dues revenue increased 3.8%. Penetration of our O.N.E. offering continues to grow and member acceptance increased to 51%. Our recently completed reinvention projects are performing as expected, significantly increasing member usage. We completed two more acquisitions this quarter and our pipeline for potential acquisitions remains strong. Reinventions and acquisitions continue to deliver superior returns on capital and we continue to believe this is the best way to deliver long-term shareholder value. We are positioned to deliver solid financial results in 2016 consistent with our outlook for the year."

In 2016, ClubCorp acquired two clubs: Marsh Creek Country Club in St. Augustine, Florida and Santa Rosa Country Club in Santa Rosa, California. As of March 22, 2016, ClubCorp owns or operates 159 golf and country clubs representing approximately 200 18-hole equivalents, of which nine are managed clubs. Additionally, it owns or operates 48 business, sports and alumni clubs, of which three are managed clubs. Total memberships increased 4,380 to 173,130, up 2.6%. Total golf and country club memberships increased 4.4%, while total business, sports and alumni club memberships declined 1.0%.

SWEETENER: COBRA Golf has partnered with Arccos Golf. Golfers will receive a complimentary Arccos Driver performance tracking and live competition system ($79.99 value) with purchase of any COBRA Golf KING Driver online and at participating retailers in the United States, Canada and United Kingdom. The promotion kicks off on May 2, 2016 and will run through June 30, 2016.

ignitedriveDRIVE FORE SHOW! PUMA Golf has introduced IGNITE Drive. It is designed, according to the company, to mimic a classic PUMA Golf silhouette but with a cool, sporty twist. The IGNITE Drive combines premium materials, PUMA said, with hand-crafted details, reflective accents and a new performance last all at a value price point. A sleeker, more refined performance last is combined with the new IGNITE Foam to provide comfort, a better fit and a stylish toe-down look. PUMA's IGNITE Foam is a responsive cushioning foam designed to maximize comfort while providing the combination of support and stability for performance, the company said. The IGNITE Drive (MSRP $120) will be available at retail starting June 1st in four colorways – White/Vibrant Orange/Drizzle; White/Periscope/Beetroot Purple; White/Black Drizzle and Black/White.

WEB GEMS:

THAT DIDN’T GO TO PLAN: Greg Norman’s plans to help coach the Chinese Olympic golf team for the Rio Olympics appear to have been dashed, with the two-time major champion saying he is no longer involved with the team. "I can only assume [this] is due to the current sentiment for golf within the country," Norman said in a statement. READ MORE>>>

FAST START: Brian Stuard shot an 8-under 64 on Thursday to top the leaderboard in the suspended first round of the Zurich Classic. Top-ranked Jason Day bogeyed his final two holes after the delay for 69. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “The only two things that I think about in life is my family and golf, and that's all I want to think about.”--Jason Day.

There has not been a repeat winner in New Orleans since Carlos Franco did it in 1999 and 2000.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 
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